Doomed Cape Town

With all the global talk being of the upcoming nuclear war between the USA (+UK, EU, South Korea) and North Korea (+China), I wondered if that was also the biggest worry on the minds of the folk all the way down here in the bottom left corner of Africa.

I chose four things which myself and my Cape Town dwelling colleagues considered particularly worrying right now and employed the most scientific method of measuring local fear that there is: a Twitter poll.

Obviously, we had to start with the whole World War Three thing. Because that’s why we got to wondering about this question in the first place.
Perhaps equally obviously, the drought is in there. Particularly as it’s a ROASTING hot day in the Mother City today and it’s basically never going to rain ever again (tomorrow’s drizzle doesn’t count).
And then, after I stumbled across this Facebook group on the weekend, the Cape Town Tsunami had to get a mention.

Just for the record, the “warnings from multiple sources” which they cite are basically a handful of people who have dreamed about a tsunami hitting Cape Town, like Debbie for example:

A truly mericaluous escape. (What happened to your son, by the way?)

…and the word of a local charlatan Pastor who wants your money “had a vision”. If you want to read more (and you do, because it’s a deep, deep rabbit hole, go and have a look at their 73 (seventy-three) page dossier, full of reasons why the tsunami will take place (not enough people being Christians, shockingly), many details of how it will occur (big wave, mostly), and what exactly will happen:

Every time I stand in Town , Milnerton God tells me and reminds me see this tall buildings they will be completely covered with water
When I stand on Sir Lowreys pass God reminds me only those who come over this pass at that given time will be safe
Snakes will be in the water and bite the people and they will die
It’s almost like those who survive water will die by shark attack or snake bites

Hectic. Milnerton God doesn’t mess around, hey?

But I digress. Often.

The fourth option was one that has plagued the province for time immemorial: the Twitter account of Lord High Empress of the Western Cape. Like here. And here. And… er… here.

Certain individuals have long believed that one of Helen Zille’s tweets would spell the end of the Western Cape… somehow. But is that something that the general public also buy into? Our poll will tell us.

The results are in:

As we can see, the religious nutcases predicting their god-driven tsunami are the least of Cape Town’s worries. Quite rightly, too. They’re not called religious nutcases for nothing.
And nuclear war – an altogether much more likely doomsday scenario – is of limited concern to Capetonians too. Could this be a geographical thing, or is it because they are actually much more panicky about one (or both, but twitter polls don’t allow for multiple voting) of the other potential apocalyptic situations?

And it’s Helen, who takes it by a head, although if I were the drought, I’d be eyeing up a coalition with that impending nuclear war to sneak top spot.

Clearly though, the two options are troubling the majority of Cape Town citizens, and I don’t really think it’s a matter of one winning through over the other. These are obviously both issues that are of huge concern to people here.

Sadly, it seems like the only thing we can do to prevent either disaster actually happening is to cut down on the amount of water we use, and cut down the amount of Twitter that Helen Zille uses. Given the numerous failed attempts by the City Council and Mmusi Maimane respectively to achieve these goals, neither seems very likely to happen any time soon.

We’re doomed, Cape Town. Doomed.

Journalistic excellence

Now look, I do think that the Mail & Guardian newspaper is one of the better examples of journalism in South Africa, albeit that the competition is not all that it could be. But since you’re one of the better ones, then perhaps when you’re tweeting about your “journalistic excellence”, you could at least ensure that all the words of the headline on the edition pictured are spelled correctly.

Interestingly, agains all the odds, this offending tweet has since disappeared.

Morning tweet

Good morning SA the petrol price is ridiculous

Actually, I often find that the relative level of outlay required to purchase refined hydrocarbons in the retail sector is best indicated by depiction of an absolutely huge blue tit and a small bunch of poorly drawn daffodils.

So yes, ridiculous, agreed.

PFTP

Busy day, busy evening ahead, so just a quick recommendation which I recently found on The Twitter:

PostcardFromThePast

Described as:

Fragments of life in real messages on postcards from the past. Delivered to you every day. Wish you were here?

It does exactly what it says on the tin. The fragments of life come as single line quotes from the postcards in question and range from the rather mundane, through to the altogether intriguing, and include several of the bewildering and bizarre. Of course, many of these snippets can be attributed to the actual holiday experience, but then there are some that provoke further interrogation.

Fullscreen capture 2016-07-28 013620 PM.bmp

If you’re in the right mood, you can become quite involved. Who is Martin, how big is his picture framing business now (clue: it’s bigger than before), and what does that have to do with a visit to Robin Hood’s Bay?

When was the last time you sent a postcard?
With WhatsApp, email and Facebook, postcards are surely dying the death, aren’t they?
Discuss [5 marks]

As I said – just a quick recommendation today, but do go along and have a look.

Vive le (temperature) difference

Much mirth and merriment on SA Twitter yesterday as the UK basked in a “heatwave”, getting up to (in some cases) the low to mid 30s Celsius.

I’m sharing this one example, not for any other reason other than because I particularly enjoyed it:

Fullscreen capture 2016-07-20 093349 AM.bmp

Amateurs indeed.

But, as your lovable local “Soutie“, can I just make the case for the other side too?

Because when you Saffas are all:

OMG! It’s so cold. I’m FREEZING! #hypothermia

throughout the winter months, while it’s a balmy 15ºC… well… how do you think I’m looking at you?

It’s almost – almost – as if the climatic conditions in the UK and SA are generally quite different, thus giving the local populaces disparate reference ranges for their understanding of “normal” weather and temperatures.

Who knew, hey? 🙂