Spring is in the air

And I’m not talking about the front right suspension unit of Gavin Watson’s Toyota Corolla at OR Tambo this morning. More to come on that story, I would imagine.

No. The changing of the seasons is upon us and the butterflies are plunging into the pool in celebration.

Sadly, the swimming stroke is a misnomer, as butterflies are completely rubbish at swimming, as the one above is painfully demonstrating.

Not much to do with this one, although I completely stand by my gentle vignetting. The background was ready made, the contrast in colours there from the start and the dust on the water just adds to the grainy film look.

It could be the poster for an early 1990s art house movie, but it’s actually just a dead butterfly on the surface of our swimming pool.

Suddenly… Spring?

Not quite. In fact, some well-read experts have suggested that special precautions be taken in view of the iffy forecast for today.

But yesterday was quite Spring-like.

The Boy Wonder had a photography assignment to do, so we went out looking for proteas. Is this one? It’s definitely a Leucospermum spp. I think, anyway. Rupert will doubtless let me know.

Cycling (yeah, I know) around the posher areas of Cape Town, we found several or more. Lots still to come at “that bush” on the corner of Glastonbury and Rhodes Drive, as well.

This one was just up the road from there. Planted outside a big house with a big wall. Probably out of place. Maybe not even a protea at all. But the colours and the intricate design caught our eyes and our lenses.

I’ll get some photos up on Flickr soon enough, but in the meantime, here’s one to brighten up a grey day.

Squares

After taking/seeing this image of my daughter amidst the flowers on the coastline at L’Agulhas, I have had The Beta Band’s Squares as an earworm.

And yes, you do know the song – you just don’t know that you know it.

As for the flowers. LOADS of them. Spectacular.

Back down south

What with one thing or another (but mainly one thing), we haven’t been able to get down to Agulhas for too long. I remedied that today, by hitting first the R316 and then the R319.

Spring has sprung here and it’s good to be back.

We did lunch in our favourite pub, walked on our favourite beach, and collected bags and bags of our favourite plastic waste as our part of that Big Beach Cleanup thing that I can’t find a link to right now.

If the clouds stay away, I might even play with the camera after dark. Or alternatively I might play with some brandy.

Either way: it’s a winner.

Tit

There’s a hint of spring in the air. That’s good, because spring is nice and warm and a forerunner of summer (yes, that happens here too). It’s not so great because we still need quite a lot of winter rain to fill up our dams.

Here’s spring-like quota photo of a Eurasian Blue Tit (Cyanistes caeruleus) exiting a nesting box last spring in Sheffield:

I’ll admit that I couldn’t remember the scientific name for this little guy, so I had to look it up. On the page was this:

Fullscreen capture 2016-08-26 022854 PM.bmp

Yeah. Bit generic, that second one.

Interestingly, the Common chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs) continues to be a problematic invasive species but only in certain parts of the Southern Suburbs:

The chaffinch was introduced from Britain into several of its overseas territories in the 19th century. In South Africa a very small breeding colony in the suburbs of Constantia, Hout Bay and Camps Bay in Cape Town is the only remnant of such an introduction.

I was shocked when I saw one in Bergvliet last year. Seeing a chaffinch was shocking, but worse was the sudden realisation that I was in Bergvliet.