Footy pitch

The:

21 Best Travel Photos Of 2017 Were Just Announced By National Geographic, And They’re Amazing!

screamed the clickbaity headline.
Perhaps I should have ignored it, but I dived in anyway and here’s what I found.

Of course, all those photos are really good, but there were two that stood out for me. One was this one, from the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. The other (predictably), this…

Norway; Drone; Football? Some frantic box-ticking going on there.

Says ‘togger (no pun intended) Misha De-Stroyev:

In Norway’s Lofoten Islands, the Henningsvær football field is considered one of the most amazing in Europe. This photo was taken during a sailing trip from Tromsø to the Lofoten Archipelago. After a week of cold and rainy weather, the sky finally cleared up enough to fly my drone. We were absolutely astonished to learn that the entire football field is heated, so after lying down and soaking in the warmth, I launched my drone and took this photo from a height of about 390 feet (120 meters).

That’s pretty much exactly what I would have done, which gives me high hopes for a personal win next year.

Now – who’s funding my trip to Norway to get some practice?

Railz

A quota photo from Norway last year. This was taken lying between the rails of the Flåmsbana, just outside the village of Flåm.

The lengths I go to and the risks I take just to get interesting shots, ne? Not that I even needed to get interesting shots that day. The rest of the scenery was by far enough to ensure the day’s photographic mission was a complete success. Fjords are great in that way.

More things I want to do in places I want to go (again)

Because of “regulations”, I’m not allowed to fly my Mavic in Namibia. I applied and I tried, but the rules there are very strict and while I submitted documentation upon documentation to a very friendly and helpful Namibian DCA, there were additional complications in that South African ATC is in charge of much of the airspace over the southern half of Namibia. Add the red tape of two different government bodies in two different countries together, and see how far you get. It’s not far.

Still, all being well, I will have had some chance to fly this side of the border while we’ve been away.
Pictures and video to follow? Maybe. But in the meantime, let’s live vicariously through FPV Customs DE, who went to Norway and had some fun with their Mavic.

HD would be your minimum setting to enjoy that one in, and if you do have 4K capabilities, well why not use them?

Every time I see Norway on these kind of videos, I realise how much I want to go back there. There are plenty of other places I want to go too, but the urge to spend some more time in Norway is currently outshining them all.

you are not alone

…if you want to end up going to Norway.

Herewith the latest from Bergen’s Alan Walker (you may remember him from such posts as Faded Restrung), Alone:

A message sent from Alan’s laptop attracts “Walkers” from all over the world to Norway, where they gather on a hillside just to the south of Bergen city centre (you’ll have noted the Brann Stadion as the video begins).
What happens next is unclear, but what we do know is that there’s some amazing Norwegian scenery involved, backed up with an uncomplicated but catchy tune, and no small degree of positivity in the song’s message.

Decent.

Hacker breaks Norwegian internet

‘Hacker’ in this case being a humpback whale and the Norwegian internet being that of the village of Skulsfjord, near Tromsø in northern Norway.

Luckily for Hacker, its plight was spotted by wildlife photographer Audun Rikardsen, who was out in his boat searching for new picture opportunities during the polar winter in the Kaldfjorden, a whale-rich fjord near Tromsø in northern Norway.

Audun got lucky. Here’s his image of the local coastguard trying to free the whale:

knolkval-fast-i-kabel-4-800x533

And yes, the yellow cord that they thought was fishing gear, wasn’t:

In the morning, they summoned a diver from the fire and rescue team, who went down and investigated. The cord was wrapped round the whale’s head, disappearing into its mouth at the bottom of the picture, before reappearing on the other side, winding round a fin and tangling up the tail. Eventually, after some difficulty, the whale was freed.

Only then did the rescuers realise that the cord was a subsea internet cable that should have been 170 metres down on the bed of the fjord.

Fjords are deep, hey? That’s over three times the depth of the deepest point in False Bay.
And while Audun may have got his picture (and it’s incredible), he then had to wait a while to actually share it, as all communications to Skulsfjord – where he lives – were knocked out for a fortnight by his new-found cetacean chum.