Sweary tourist guide fined

Incoming from the Isle of Man…

[The TT being the annual motorcycle races there and Senior Race being (arguably) the biggest race for the week.] [Hoorah for context.]

Indeed.

I was a little confused by this story. Shouting at people isn’t a nice thing to do, and shouting at TT visitors is both rude and foolish, especially when the tourist trade on the island relies so heavily on their attendance at the Races. But despite her shouting and swearing at the visitors, she did seem to be attempting to assist them with enriching their stay:

Shelley Eileen Wardally, of Demesne Road, in Douglas, was seen by plain-clothed police officers shouting and swearing at visitors calling them ‘come-overs’ and telling them where to go.

The Isle of Man is a truly beautiful place. My spiritual home.
There are many wonderful places to visit there, many of them sequestered away from the prying eyes of the tourists. Some locals might prefer it kept that way, but Shelley is clearly all about sharing the wealth with her useful advice in “telling them where to go”.

I’m obviously not party to exactly where she suggested, but Colby Glen is an underrated hidden gem in the south of the island. Bluebells, wild garlic, a little brook running through it. I’ll bet that was included.
But then it all gets a bit weird:

…officers approached and spoke to her about her behaviour.

She then turned her abuse to the police as she swore at them telling them where to go.

Er… Shelley. These guys are from the Isle of Man. It’s likely that they are aware of all the incredible experiences it has to offer. You’re wasting your time in telling them where to go. They already know where to go.

They are fully cognisant of the local attractions, Shelley.

Why would Shelley be telling police officers where to go, then?

Wardally was said to be holding a can of Strongbow as officers approached

Ah. The Strongbow “defence”. It’s basically more of an admission of guilt.

Defence advocate Paul Glover said: “Ms Wardally informs me she had too much to drink that day and emotions got the better of her.”

I do understand, Shelley. Sometimes the sheer beauty of the Gem of God’s Earth gets to us all, and we simply can’t hold back. It’s completely overwhelming and you need to get it out of your system before you just… explode and start drunkenly shouting at tourists in Douglas.

“But for Senior Race Day this offence wouldn’t have taken place.”

As The Jacksons infamously told us: Don’t blame it on the sunshine, don’t blame it on the moonlight, don’t blame it on the good time, blame it on… er… Senior Race Day.

Which happens every year.

No, Shelley – I think we need to blame it on the Strongbow.

The 46-year-old has been fined £275 after admitting being drunk and disorderly. She was also ordered to pay £125 prosecution costs.

Ja. See? The offence was ‘drunk and disorderly’, not ‘simply existing on Senior Race Day’.

This is clearly a message to anyone blurting out he location of secret sites to tourists. It seems that the Manx justice system will do anything to stop their private spots from being revealed.

Keep it to yourself next year, Shelley.

Last times…

Last time we were on the Isle of Man, it rained. It rained a lot.
It very rarely stopped raining. And then we went to Sheffield in it rained some more.

Now I know that the UK (of which the Isle of Man isn’t part), has a bit of a reputation for this kind of thing, but the summer of 2012 was unprecedented in its raininess. There were literally a couple of nice days during our entire three week stay. The Flickr collection I made is testament to this.

We deserve better this time.

Of course, I not forgetting that we did get better back in 2009. The holiday where I regularly ended up taking our toddler son out (not in an assassination kind of way) at 6am before he woke up the whole household because he’d forgotten how to sleep:

This one was taken at the Calf Sound, where there was only us, some rabbits, some seals and a small yacht.

He’s twelve now, and does sleep occasionally. I’m hoping that this holiday is one of those times.

London

Google Trips tells me that I am spending the day in London today.

Yes, the train from Paris arrived here yesterday evening, but then it was all about the dash to get down to our hosts’ place after a day of travel.

Today, we get to explore.

Last time we were in The Big Smoke was just 10 months ago on a day trip down from Sheffield. [pics]

The light was awful that day. But perfect if you wanted to get a menacing shot of a Tower of London raven.

It’s also Tynwald Day in the Isle of Man. According to Google Trips, we’ll be popping over there on Saturday morning.

Drone homework

I’ve been planning ahead for our trip to Europe later in the year. Part of that planning is working out where I can safely and legally fly my Mavic.

It’s reasonable to say that there are differences in the approach to drone rules and regulations between differing countries.

Take, for example, the Isle of Man:

Basically, with a few provisos here and there, together with a dollop of common sense and a healthy respect for other people, you can fly your drone up to 120m high anywhere outside that red circle.

You need to employ those same provisos, that common sense and respect in France too. But it’s a bit more complex than the IOM.
Here’s a map of the bit of France we’re going to:

Right.

Easy stuff first: no flying in the red bits; but yes flying (up to 150m, nogal) in the uncoloured bits. No problem.
From there though, it gets complicated. Pink areas allow flight to 30m altitude. You can fly up to 50m up in the orange (or is it peach?) areas. Even better, in the peach (or is it orange?) areas, you’re permitted to fly at 60m up from your takeoff spot. I’m not sure why they have this 10m difference. Presumably, something important happens (or is likely to happen) in this narrow strip of airspace in orange areas that doesn’t happen in the peach areas. Oh, and then in the yellow areas, you can fly up to a height of 100m.

I’m happy to comply with all of this, of course. It’s just that it’s massively complicated given that we go through a constantly changing kaleidoscope of colour as we wend our way downstream, so I’m going to have to keep a digital, zoomable copy of this map to hand.

The other thing is that for a lot of these restricted areas, it’s not very clear why there are restrictions. That doesn’t matter, of course – if it says not to fly, you don’t fly. It would just be nice to know what that bizarre mirror image of a question mark is bottom right. And why there’s that huge, weirdly shaped peach (orange?) swathe right across the middle of the map.

Obviously, I’m going to follow all the rules and regulations. There’s more than enough opportunity to get some decent shots and video in between all the bureaucracy.

But it’s going to be much more simple to chuck Florence the Mavic up once we get over to the Isle of Man.

Noa Bakehouse Fire

I spotted news that that there was a fire at the Noa Bakehouse in Douglas, Isle of Man. Fortunately, it was a small fire and there wasn’t much damage.

However, emergency services are still on the scene.

Still. Two days later.

Just in case.