Theewaterskloof not revisited

More amazing blogger professionalism here as I noted that it was (almost) a year ago when I took this group of pictures at the – then empty – Theewaterskloof Dam near Villiersdorp. Here’s the post.

It being (almost) one year on, it seems reasonable – essential, even – that I should return and do a comparison set of images. But I simply don’t have the time to fit that in, so you’ll just have to take my word for the fact that things are much improved from those worrying conditions of early February 2018. w

Today, Theewaterskloof stands at 48% full, compared to 14% when we visited last year. Overall, our dams are 62% full, compared to 27% this time last year. There are no worries about not having water in a couple of months time. All is good. All is moist.

There is a small, yet vocal, minority of individuals who still believe that the entire water crisis was simply a myth. They argue that it was merely a DA (our local ruling party) ploy to charge more money for water and to install Israeli-made water meters. There are two points that I would like to make to these people:

Firstly, that there is a small, yet vocal, minority of individuals who still believe that the moon landings were faked.
They are also wrong.

Secondly, supposing for just a moment that their allegations are correct (which they’re not); the sheer amount of effort to clandestinely remove billions and billions of litres of water over three years – enough to fool NASA (the same guys who faked the moon landings), prevent meaningful precipitation over a catchment area of 500 square kilometres (for Theewaterskloof alone) for 36 months and make news headlines worldwide surely deserves some sort of accolade?
Admit it: that is an incredible endeavour.

And for those thinking of switching their upcoming election vote away from the DA because of the way that they handled the crisis (and yes, it certainly wasn’t perfect), please make sure you choose to vote for a party which you genuinely believe could have managed it any better.
There’s suddenly not such a great selection any more, hey?

FBYC timelapse

None of the things I said I hadn’t done yesterday have been done, aside from the braai which was actually in Simonstown, and not Fishhoek. No harm done, since we found this out just before we set off for Fishhoek, which is on the way to Simonstown anyway.

The braai – at the posh yacht club, nogal – was a lot of fun with plenty of waterborne activities for the kids, and The Boy  Wonder set up a timelapse to record (some of) the afternoon while I slaved over the hot coals.

Not bad for a entry level mobile phone on an entry level tripod.
Colour me impressed.

Now I really need to make a start on those jobs I needed to have done a couple of days ago.

See you tomorrow.

Longest day 2018

It’s tomorrow, if you find yourself south of the equator. Which we are.

Cape Town enjoys a remarkable 14 hours, 25 minutes and 5 seconds of daylight tomorrow, with the sun rising at 05:31 and sinking below the Atlantic horizon at 19:56 in the evening.
That’s a whole 4 hours, 32 minutes longer than on the June Solstice.

It’s fair to say that you’d have to have blinked (literally) to miss the change from today though, because it was only a fraction of second shorter. That’s because the summer solstice for us has actually slipped into the early hours of the 22nd (coincidentally 22 minutes after midnight to be exact, for the purists out there).

Things go badly wrong on the 23rd though, with a massive 3 seconds shaved off our daytime, as sunrise creeps later a little more quickly than sunset does – and it’s all downhill down there until midwinter. By the the 28th, we’ve already lost a whole minute!

The latest Cape Town sunset this summer is 20:01 on the 7th January.

And the sun is closest to us on 3rd January at 12:50 – a mere 147.100 million kilometres away: Ladies and gentlemen of the class of ’99: wear sunscreen.

Meh: Advice, like youth, probably just wasted on the young.

Need a New Year’s Resolution?

NB: No payment has been made for this post (see below for details).
It’s just a service I’d like to tell you about and advise you to use.

If you want to make a change, why not make it now? Whether it’s Monday, March or May. I mean, why wait? If it’s worth doing, do it. Right?

We’re not all that way inclined though. And some might talk the talk, but not follow through by walking the proverbial walk.
Some people might need a bit of a kick up the butt, and they might be crouched hopefully with their back to New Year’s Eve, because January 1st might be the swinging foot they have been waiting for.

Whichever category you fall into (and for most Capetonians, my experience says you are in the one awaiting the boot), here’s a good idea for something worthwhile that you can do with many, many benefits.

Recycling. It’s all the rage and you may have heard of it before. But while it sounds like a great idea (and it is a great idea), it’s actually a bit of a shlep to do. And so you don’t do it.

What I’m suggesting to you is different.
What I’m suggesting to you is Recycling with Mr Recycle

Mr Recycle: the website.

Check the name, bru. It’s like he was born into the trade.

Mr Recycle picks up your recycling each and every week (we’ve been using him for several years now and he is the most reliable regular service I’ve experienced in Cape Town) and takes it to the local recycling facility for you. All you have to do is bag your recycling up and pop it outside your door on the relevant day. It disappears in the early evening without you even knowing and goes where it can be reused, instead of choking a seal.

It’s so easy.

Prices start at a frankly ridiculous R25 a week. And yes, there are terms and conditions to protect both you and Mr Recycle, but it’s hardly rocket surgery, guys.

I’m not being paid in cash or kind to write this, even though I sound like an influencer desperately trying to promote a local hotel in order to be able to desperately promote another local hotel next week. There’s nothing in it for me, but cape tonMr Recycle has just picked up our recycling bang on time again and without any fuss. This guy has helped us to reduce our landfill to less than half a bin a week for a family of four and I think it’s a no-brainer if you’re looking for a worthwhile initiative to support in 2019.

Everyone wins.

Please spread this post far and wide (within Cape Town) and tell your friends to use Mr Recycle – REGISTER HERE – to get their recycling recycled.

Message ends.

December 2018 Cape Town Loadshedding Links

Like a poor sequel, loadshedding (you may remember it from such terms as “Rolling Blackouts”) has returned, and once again, we are regularly being plunged into darkness.

Being plunged into darkness is never good at the best of times, but if you don’t know that it’s coming, it can be particularly irritating. So, best that you know when it’s coming then, and we’re here to help.

The good news for those of us in Cape Town is that some degree of loadshedding is often mitigated by our spare generation capacity (the hydroelectric unit up at Steenbras).

If you’re going to work out when and how much you’re going to be loadshod, you need a few bits of information. First off, you need to know whether you are supplied by the City or by Eskom and you need to know what stage loadshedding we are on.

To see what stage the local loadshedding is on, check this page.

To check for who your supplier is, look at the map here.

If you’re not in one of the cheerfully coloured areas, you’re an Eskom customer, and you should go here to view the appropriate schedules.

If you are in one of the cheerfully coloured areas, look at which one and then head here to see when you’re going to be cut off.

And that’s it. Loadshedding isn’t an exact science, so no promises made as to what might actually happen on the ground at the time, but this is as good a guideline as you’re going to get.

Loadshedding should last for about 2½ hours a pop. If it goes on much longer than that something has gone wrong (or it wasn’t loadshedding in the first place – other electrical problems are also possible), talk to the City on 0860 103 089 or Eskom on 086 00 37566.

Or do some online shouty stuff:

Don’t forget to not tell them where you live. That’s always helps.

Other useful links:
City twitter
Eskom twitter
Khulu Phasiwe twitter – Eskom spokesperson – DO NOT SHOOT THE MESSENGER.