Bin Tagging in Cape Town

The City of Cape Town is electronically tagging all its wheelie bins in an effort to improve service delivery and limit theft.

The tags will allow the City to monitor each bin serviced and to identify bins that are lost, stolen, or illegally serviced without being City property.

I get that scanning a bin as it is “serviced” (i.e. emptied), is reasonable and could provide good data as to how effectively refuse collection teams are working. And of course, I understand that being able to scan a stolen bin could assist in reuniting it promptly with its rightful (and probably tearful) owner.
But I’m not sure about bins being “illegally serviced”. Who would do that? Why would anyone want to do that? Surely you’d need a big truck with which to block the traffic and one of those hydraulic lifty things on the back. I can’t see anyone doing that. Really, I can’t.

Anyway, the upshot of this is that every single one of the city’s 800,000 bins is going to be tagged by teams from RAMM Technologies. They’ll be coming round to your house (assuming you have a house, that house is in Cape Town and you have a bin) and electronically tagging it. You should expect their call over the next couple of months.

For the public to easily identify these crews, RAMM crew members will be required to carry an identification card containing the following information:

  • City of Cape Town logo
  • Photograph of the crew member’s face
  • Member’s surname
  • Member’s first name/s
  • RAMM operations’ telephone number

This information not only means that you can easily identify RAMM crew members and also for any impostor to have all they need to craft a realistic-looking fake ID card. Happy days. If you’re worried that the people at your door aren’t from RAMM, you can call their depot on 086 111 7266 to check.

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Noble looking beagle quota photo

Does exactly what it says on the tin.

image

Say what you like about beagles; they are very good at eating everything you own looking noble in photographs.
And that’s perfect when you’re running a bit short of time and there’s Champignons League footy on.

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Bathing Bishop

We went to Intaka Island Nature Reserve this weekend, and it’s something I’d completely recommend to families with kids. Ours (and their friend) loved the boat trip, loved climbing on the old steam engines and enjoyed the walk through the reserve. Although they also got into ticking the birds and other animals we saw off their list, the whole sitting quietly and still and watching thing wasn’t for them so much. Perhaps that’s why I didn’t get many decent photos or perhaps I’m just looking for an excuse. Anyway, in a very average collection of pics, at least this one of a Southern Red Bishop (Euplectes orix) bucked the trend a little.

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Maybe I need to go back again with a little more time and a little less child – there were some amazing birds there: Reed Cormorants, Purple Heron, Pin-tailed Whydahs and even a Little Bittern and chick, (which I didn’t quite get to see but spoke to a lady that did).

That’s almost the same, right?

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Balloons

The Albuquerque Balloon Fiesta is the biggest in the world, and the 2014 edition was captured by Knate Myers, who timelapsed this short film:

As with many of these timelapses, it rather mesmerising, isn’t it? And that last shot shows the incredible scale of the whole thing.

Beautiful.

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Loadshedding Schedules – November 2014

Latest information and schedules for:

Areas directly supplied by Eskom  

Cape Town Loadshedding Region Map
Cape Town Loadshedding Schedule (from November 2014)

Ekurheleni Metro

Ethekwini Metro

Nelson Mandela Bay Metro

Tshwane

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