Chores

Because, like most people, I enjoy weekends where I can be lazy and not do anything, I have to suffer occasional days like today, where a critical point of all those little jobs I should have done (and didn’t) is reached. It’s nothing too taxing, to be honest. A fish tank to clean here, a garage workbench to tidy there, some settings to fix on the Mavic, an important junction box to be mended so that the internet can continue to flow into the house, and quite a lot of iTunes to sort out. Again.

At least that last one can be accompanied by some decent tunage.
I’m currently enjoying some vintage Pet Shop Boys while the beagle snores on the couch behind me and I delete a huge amount of crap from my library.
It’s not exactly strenuous, but I seem to be constantly refining the way iTunes handles my music. I do wish there was a better alternative for my musical collection.

Back to it. Braai and beers to look forward to later.

Xmas 2017 John Lewis ad out

This year, it’s all about Moz the Monster. Hashtag: #MozTheMonster

Summary: little boy meets monster, fails academically due to immediate infatuation leading to poor time management and self care, turns life around after a mysterious Xmas gift intervention changes his circumstances.
A demonstration of utterly terrible parenting throughout, and quite clearly an analogy for the scourge of illicit drug use in adolescence.

But all’s well that ends well, hey?

The music is Golden Slumbers (yes, a Beatles cover), is by Elbow and is the best bit about this otherwise disappointing two minutes which allegedly cost £7,000,000 and 7 months to make.

Previous John Lewis Xmas ads destroyed on 6000 miles… may include:

2016 Buster The Boxer
2015 Man On The Moon
2014 Monty The Penguin

Weekend Listening: Everything Everything

The fourth album from this Manchester-based Indie-Synth outfit has been gracing my ears for several (or more) weeks now. It’s really, really good. Really good. The best good. Really good.
And with them releasing a third single from A Fever Dream, it’s high time that I shared something from it. Trouble is – which one?

Desire? A powerful monologue about needing to own and control everyone and everything, with a brightly colourful performance video.
Can’t Do? A desperate plea to escape a demanding and possibly doomed relationship, with a fitting video featuring emotional contemporary dancers.

Or this one: Night of the Long Knives with diving synth drops every few bars and a suitably busy, eclectic visual offering.

There’s lots more good stuff on this album though. Commercially good stuff, nogal. If you’re looking for something (mostly) energetic and just eminently listenable for the upcoming weekend (and beyond), may I humbly – and most highly – recommend this

House prices

This is not a comment on the crazy prices for property in Cape Town. Even with ‘semigration’, the Mountain, those beaches, dem winelands and the fact that it’s not in Gauteng, those property prices in Cape Town are crazy.

But, like I said, that’s not what this post is about.

This is a post about me wondering how the people who come up with those house prices, come up with those house prices. And here’s the property that prompted it, sent to me earlier this morning.

Now, before we go any further, I know that once this house is sold, it will disappear from the internet. So here’s a screenshot, in case you’re reading this in 2022 or something.

Again, I’m not commenting on whether the price quoted makes this a great deal or a complete rip-off. How much do you charge for interior features like “House Levels”, anyway?

No. I’m commenting on the selling price.

How did they arrive at that figure? (It’s about $235,000 or £178,000 for you uitlanders, by the way.)

It’s basically got to be a disagreement between the houseowner and the agent, hasn’t it?

The estate agent felt that R3,250,000 would be a reasonable place to start, only to be told by an indignant owner that they wanted it on the market for R3,400,000 “and not a penny less!”.

How would that conversation have panned out? Well, the estate agent will have surely have pushed back…

“But no-one will look at it if we put it on at R3,400,000. It’s too high. Believe me, I’m an expert in this property market.”

“No-one will look at it?!?! It’s got 5 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, a kitchenette which could easily be converted to a full kitchen on the lower level and a well appointed kitchen and scullery on the upper level. That’s 1½ kitchens, mate. One. And. A. Half. Kitchens. R3,400,000.”

“Hmm. The kitchen thing is good, yes. How about R3,300,000 then?”

“OK. I’ll meet you halfway. R3,350,000. Not a penny less!”

“Well, a lot of people on our website actually search for properties which are less than R3,333,333, because they simply can’t be arsed to move their finger from the 3 key once it’s there. Marketed at R3,350,000, your property won’t be in those searches. And fewer views means less chance of selling. How about R3,325,000?”

“How about R3,330,000?”

“How about R3,327,500?”

“Well… OK then. But it’d better sell quickly.”

“I’m sure it will, it’s a great property.”

“R3,328,000.”

“I’m sorry, what?”

 

I don’t want to buy this house. It’s ugly and it has too much kitchen space.
And it’s got a weird price tag.

Two Eighty

My favourite twitter post about twitter’s new 280 character limit was this one:

I know that it might not mean a lot to those readers who don’t use twitter, so belatedly, I’m dedicating this post to those readers who use twitter.

Sorry to the rest of you.

As for the 280 character limit, I’m slight on the I’d-rather-that-they’d-just-left-things-as-they-were side of ambivalent, but I won’t be demanding a refund (just yet).