Dead Fish

I’m running behind. I wanted to have sunset pictures here for you today (proper ones), but we spent much longer on the beach today that any of us expected, and thus everything is running a couple (or more) hours late.

Meanwhile, I have got some Mavic photos up from the weekend: here.

Here’s one of my favourites…

The boy was frantically gesturing at something. But I had no idea what he was trying to point out. It was only when I flew overhead that it suddenly became clear what it was… 🙂

Quite Astonishing Sunset

Suiderstrand, this evening. Seriously (and I have given this some thought), the most amazing sunset I think I have ever seen.

This is the Instagram upload (but #nofilter, ok?) because I don’t have bandwidth and service to upload the “proper” pictures from out here in die bos.  I’ll tag a link to them when I get back to Cape Town, so come back tomorrow evening.

UPDATE: Here they are.

This evening, though?
Quite astonishing.

An Important Message

I’ve blogged, commented and remarked about the Cape Town drought for quite a while now. That because I like to blog, comment and remark on things and the Cape Town drought has been going on for quite a while now.

Problem is: it’s still going on.

With that in mind, and with squeaky bum time well and truly upon us, I’m reproducing this Media Release from the City of Cape Town in full. If you’re a local, give it a read and take a moment to contemplate the contents. This is serious.

Drought crisis warning: Use water only for drinking, washing and cooking

15 May 2017

Dam levels are now at 21,2% (storage levels), which is 0,8% down from a week ago. With the last 10% of a dam’s water mostly not being useable, dam levels are effectively at 11,2%. The latest consumption has jumped up again to 718 million litres, which is 118 million litres over the consumption target of 600 million litres. This communication serves as a critical warning to all water users in Cape Town to cut all non-essential use of water immediately. This is not a drill.

The City of Cape Town warns all residents and businesses in Cape Town to cut non-essential municipal water use immediately. The City’s Mayoral Committee is expected to recommend to Council the implementation of Level 4 water restrictions tomorrow, 16 May 2017. This would entail a ban on all use of municipal water for outside and non-essential purposes.

‘We are essentially saying that you are only allowed to use a bit of water for drinking, cooking and washing. We are reaching a critical point in this drought crisis. Although we continue to work non-stop to force consumption down, overall use remains catastrophically high. This is not a request. We have seen huge saving-efforts, but the unseasonably hot autumn is exacerbating the situation and we must all do more.

‘Rain or shine, we are now at a point where all consumers must use below 100 litres per day. Stop flushing toilets when not necessary, shower for less than two minutes a day or use a wet cloth for a ‘wipe-down’, collect all would-be wasted water and use it to fill up toilet cisterns, among others,’ said the City’s Mayoral Committee Member for Informal Settlements, Water and Waste Services; and Energy, Councillor Xanthea Limberg.

Dredging operations have started at the Voëlvlei Dam to prepare for low-level extraction of water. The City is engaging with the lead authority, the National Department of Water and Sanitation, as a matter of urgency to request dredging operations at Theewaterskloof Dam too.

The City continues with its pressure reduction programmes across the metro which forcibly reduces supply at a given time. Other emergency interventions are under way, and if required, the City will start to implement a lifeline supply of water across the metro.

‘In a severe drought such as what we are dealing with, the only real immediate intervention is to cut usage. Over this coming week, we must bring consumption down with 100 million litres of water per day. The City also warns businesses to start implementing contingency and alternative water measures in their own operations,’ said Councillor Limberg.

Use water only for drinking, washing and cooking:

  • Only flush the toilet when necessary. Don’t use it as a dustbin. ‘If it’s yellow let it mellow. If it’s brown, flush it down’
  • Take a short 2-minute shower. A standard (non –water-saving) showerhead can use as much as 16 litres per minute
  • Collect your shower, bath and basin water and re-use it to flush your toilet, and for the garden and cleaning. *Greywater use has some health and hygiene risks you must avoid. Keep hands and surface areas sanitised/disinfected.
  • Defrost foods in the fridge or naturally rather than placing it under running water
  • Use a cup instead of running taps in the bathroom or kitchen, for brushing teeth, shaving, drinking etc.
  • Wait for a full load before running washing machines and dishwashers. The rinse water from some washing machines can be reused for the next wash cycle.
  • Switch to an efficient showerhead which uses no more than 10 litres per minute, as per the City’s by-law.
  • Upgrade to a multi-flush toilet and/or put a water displacement item in the cistern which can halve your water use per flush.
  • Fit taps with aerators or restrictors to reduce flow to no more than 6 litres per minute, as per the City’s by-law.

How to check for leaks on your property:

1.    Close all taps on the property and don’t flush the toilets
2.    Check and record your meter reading
3.    Wait 15 minutes and record the meter reading
4.    If there is a difference in your meter reading, you have a leak
5.    Call a plumber if it is not a DIY job

One leaking toilet wastes between about 2 600 and 13 000 litres per month, depending on the flow rate of the leak. A leaking tap wastes between about 400 and 2 600 litres per month.

Residents can contact the City via email to water@capetown.gov.za for queries or to report contraventions of the water restrictions (evidence should be provided to assist the City’s enforcement efforts) or they can send an SMS to 31373.

For further information, residents should please visit the water restrictions page on the City’s website: www.capetown.gov.za/thinkwater
End

Published by:
City of Cape Town, Media Office

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and:
End

Published by:
6000.co.za

Sunrise

Being on the west coast, Cape Town is definitely better known for its sunsets rather than its sunrises. Want one of those early morning pictures taken from an urban environment? Go to Durban.
Durban’s geographical location on the east coast of South Africa means that the sun tends to pop up there way before the sleepy Cape has even contemplated leaving its slumbers. Sunrise City, Durban is.

I’m not in Durban, but when I saw the sky beginning to light up this morning, and with Mrs 6000 volunteering to take on the school run, I took the opportunity to chuck Florence the Mavic Pro up to about 120m and snapped this:

Not bad, Cape Town. Considering you’re more about the evening thing, not bad at all.

And no, I’m not a bad workman blaming his tools the local atmosphere, but the mist and the pollution over the Cape Flats makes this image look misty and polluted. The camera isn’t to blame. The subject actually is misty and polluted. Photograph is accurate. We need some wind and rain to clean things up a bit, although then that makes flying less possible.
Catch 22, ne?

As ever, this looks better bigger and on a black background, here.

Plunge (x2)

So, I took the plunge and I bought myself an Adobe Lightroom subscription. I’ve actually been using their free trial version to sort out the Shamwari photos, and I think it’s been going ok (and I’ve actually had some nice comments), so it seems to be worth it.

I took advice from (amongst others) this guy, who clearly knows what he is doing in the ‘togging game, and whose input is therefore to be acted upon.
UPDATE: Apparently that Flickr link will only work if you have a Flickr account.

Earlier, he dropped this little number*:

… which he took from his living room!

Yeah. Not many places you can do that from, so either he lives near the sea (he does) or he lives in Shropshire (the UK equivalent of the Free State) and just has some really good lenses.

Anyway, you might be wondering why I’m rambling on this way, even more annoyingly and pointlessly than usual, and it’s because when you buy Lightroom, you need to re-download it. No upgrading or simple activating of the free trial version here.

And have you seen how fast SA internet isn’t?

There’s time to fill before I can play with my new purchase…

 

* which is the second plunge, see?