Landscapes

If I take photos of local mountains and stuff, a lot of the time, they are actually landsCapes, because of where I live: Cape Town. So, landsCapes… Capes.

Geddit?

Fortuitously, that’s not what this post is about. This post is about the recently announced Landscape Photographer of the Year 2017 awards in the UK, “showcasing Britain’s eclectic landscapes”, and being reported about in The Guardian.

Now obviously, all the images that they’ve given us in the article are really good, they’re unlikely to lob an Owen Crompton in there or anything, so having looked at the brief, I’ve chosen a couple of my favourites which fit it nicely to share here. Click through on the link above if you want to see the rest. It’s not rocket science, folks.

First up, George Robertson’s The Cauldron, the industrial landscape of Grangemouth in Stirlingshire. It won the “Urban” category:

And then, about 150km south of there, across the border into civilisation (although you might not think it by comparing the images), Ken Rennie’s The Raven. (That being the name of the boat in the photograph.)

Quite glorious, both. And a reminder that while South Africa and other countries may have the natural features, the outstanding beauty and the drama on an altogether more impressive scale, the UK can still have its moments.

9/11

Yes I’m travelling by plane again today, so I don’t really want to think about this sort of thing, but equally, I’m going to be very short of time to blog, so I’m just going to direct you to this (long, but worth it) read, titled:

‘We’re the Only Plane in the Sky’

and subheaded:

Where was the president in the eight hours after the Sept. 11 attacks? The strange, harrowing journey of Air Force One, as told by the people who were on board.

It’s very good.

Ship timelapse

Timelapse videos are right up there amongst my favourite sort of videos, and this one is no exception. 30 days at sea, condensed into 10 minutes.

Let’s go.

If you made it through the whole thing, you just saw around 80,000 images combined, using 1500GB of project files.

Big ship. Big numbers.

Unspiration

My new favourite Instagram account (apart from my own Instagram account, durr!) is this one: Unspirational.

When browsing Instagram, I don’t see a lot of landscapes ruined by pithy “inspirational” quotes, because I carefully choose to follow people who carefully choose not to post landscapes ruined by pithy “inspirational” quotes.

It’s not rocket science.

Still, I am aware of the LRBP”I”Q phenomenon, so it’s nice that someone has come up with an antithesis to it. And the best bit (for me) is that a lot of these un(in)spirational are loosely based around well-known “inspirational” quotes. Clever.

Many are full of good advice:

Plenty more where that came from – so click through on the link above and be generally anti-social, miserable (but actually rather amused) just like me.

Footy pitch

The:

21 Best Travel Photos Of 2017 Were Just Announced By National Geographic, And They’re Amazing!

screamed the clickbaity headline.
Perhaps I should have ignored it, but I dived in anyway and here’s what I found.

Of course, all those photos are really good, but there were two that stood out for me. One was this one, from the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. The other (predictably), this…

Norway; Drone; Football? Some frantic box-ticking going on there.

Says ‘togger (no pun intended) Misha De-Stroyev:

In Norway’s Lofoten Islands, the Henningsvær football field is considered one of the most amazing in Europe. This photo was taken during a sailing trip from Tromsø to the Lofoten Archipelago. After a week of cold and rainy weather, the sky finally cleared up enough to fly my drone. We were absolutely astonished to learn that the entire football field is heated, so after lying down and soaking in the warmth, I launched my drone and took this photo from a height of about 390 feet (120 meters).

That’s pretty much exactly what I would have done, which gives me high hopes for a personal win next year.

Now – who’s funding my trip to Norway to get some practice?