Peter says…

In his latest video, photographer, cinematographer, vlogger and all round nice chap Peter McKinnon (Youtube, IG) tells us why he chose to drop his popular Two Minute Tuesday tutorial uploads:

I created two minute Tuesday because I just wanted a video that I could make every week that was only two minutes and I could make it about anything I wanted: an easy way to make content, a consistent way to get content.

But then:

It started to become this assumed… that every Tuesday it would be something that you would learn… something that I would teach. And the problem with that is that there’s a limit to everything that I know!
I ran out of ideas. There’s times when I’m sitting there thinking to myself “what could I possibly teach today? I feel like I’ve done everything. I’ve got nothing else to give.”

What follows is an introspective session debating whether it is better to make content merely to stick to a schedule or whether the real aim is to make what you want, when you want to. And for Peter, that was an easy question to answer, and that’s why he dropped Two Minute Tuesday.

That clearly makes sense for someone in Peter’s position. It’s his job; it’s how he makes his living, and so yes, he has to produce high quality results in order to maintain standards and so keep earning money from it.

I have to do the same thing with my job. And I do.

But this blog isn’t my job.  And besides which, there’s more to this whole “forced” versus “organic” content debate – a very important more:

You want to put out a constant stream of content so that your fans, people that enjoy consuming that content get used to coming back every week and seeing the stuff that you’re making.

Yep – audience expectancy. Because there will always be some percentage of the people who watch your videos or read your posts who want a continual stream of content, rather than one or two (perceived) high quality pieces here or there. And because I can’t ever guarantee time, inclination, effort or ability to be able to produce those one or two gems every week (or whenever), you get saddled with “something” every day.

Sorry for you.

But I have to say, people keep coming back. They might come back and be regularly disappointed, but they do keep coming back. (I’m not sure what sort of people these are when I look at it this way, but still…)

And guess what? Peter has given up on giving up of his Two Minute Tuesdays and is now following my lead:

I’ve decided to start doing them again; it’s just not going to be tutorials every week. It could be pretty random… It could be just anything and everything.

Which, considering he’s never even seen it, sums up this blog pretty well.

Welcome back, Two Minute Tuesday. We’ve missed you.

6000.co.za on grida.no

Indeed.

While I was enjoying the hospitality of the local… er… hospital yesterday*, some of my recent photos of Theewaterskloof

…were being used (with permissions and credits, I hasten to add) on the website of Norwegian environmental NGO, GRID Arendal.

GRID-Arendal was established in 1989 to support environmentally sustainable development by working with UN Environment and other partners. We communicate environmental knowledge that strengthens management capacity and motivates decision-makers to act. We transform environmental data into credible, science-based information products, delivered through innovative communication tools and capacity building services.

Now you know.

 

GRID-Arendal have been doing a lot of work on water provision and sustainability across Africa, and this article (with my photos) details Cape Town’s current plight for their readers around the world.

As I mentioned earlier in the year, I’m also looking forward to having some of my snaps published in other publications this year (and some in a book due for publication in September 2019!).

 

* with apparently what should be a positive outcome [champagne bottle emoji] [I’ll keep you informed emoji].

Tomtop

Let’s run through a quick backstory here.

New school year, new extra murals for the kids. But there’s bad news: the boy’s cooking class (which he loves) has been cancelled because there isn’t enough interest. Sad.
Instead though, because every cloud has a silver lining, he’s joined the Photography Club at school.  Chip off the old blog and all that…

An old camera is a helpful thing to have for this sort of thing and he’s extremely lucky in that I have kept my old Panasonic and my old Sony. Given the choice, it seems sensible to use the Sony, which is still a really good, solid bridge camera. The only issue being that I can’t find the charger (it does have a microUSB to charge through though, so still usable) and the one battery doesn’t hold charge as well as it did. Still, it’s more than fine for an eleven year old starting out at school Photography Club.

I wondered how much it would cost to get a new battery. Turns out that it’s fairly pricey everywhere, but there’s this Chinese online place called Tomtop which has a typically eclectic selection of goods at all too reasonable prices. I’d never heard of Tomtop, but two appropriate batteries and a charger were available for the princely sum of R150.33 including tracked shipping. Still too good to be true? Well, no issue if so because payment was via PayPal, meaning that I’m covered should this turn out to be a complete scam. Back of the net!

I’ll keep you informed as to any progress.

Inevitably though, there had to be a downside. Life, ne?
That downside is that the google ads on every webpage I visit are now Tomtop ads.

All of them feature the actual product that I purchased, which doesn’t really make sense to me, but to be honest, that all pales into complete and utter insignificance when you look at what else it’s suggesting that I should buy.

I don’t have the cleavage to carry off that bottom outfit.
I do have the legs for the LBD above it though.

But… but… the man praying in the big black genitalia suit?
Why on earth would I be interested in that sort of thing?

I’m an atheist.

Nitty gritty

Incoming from one of those doctors I mentioned here.

Live Scottish Gritter Tracking!

(“Gritters”, for the uninitiated, being the lorries which go around spreading rock salt on snowy and icy roads, lowering the melting point of the slippy stuff, and therefore making the roads safer to drive on.)

Even better is the fact that some of the vehicles have comedy names, like the ones you see above. Sprinkles seems like a wholly inappropriate name for a 15-tonne monster throwing grit at anything in the vicinity.

So just as it should be.

Obviously, you need it to be wintery (like today) for the full benefit of the above site. You’re not going to see much happening on there in July.

The email also included some good wishes for my knee.
My knee is doing ok, thank you. Even after a short barefoot run (first one in 7 months) last night.
My feet are full of thorns though. Full. Wynberg Boys need to sort out their bottom

 

field.

Thanks Doc

Flights

For some reason, it seems that I like planes. Not in a Let’s Go And Stand At The Airport For Days On End And Note Down Their Registration Numbers way, but definitely in a Since We’re At The Airport Let’s Go And Have A Coffee Somewhere We Can See The Runway From way. It’s an interest, not an obsession.

Of course, the only obsessive bit of this interest is the Airbus A380. Scarce in Cape Town thanks to our thin taxiways, but always a pleasure to get on in Dubai and go to Manchester. This (mild) obsession resulted in me following British Airways A380 pilot Dave Wallsworth on twitter. I mentioned this to you on here almost two years ago.

Captain Dave  has now released a pair of YouTube videos showing exactly how an A380 takes off and lands. Yes, it’s a bit nerdy, in that it’s 10 minutes (each time) of real time footage, and it seems that aside from a few short words and actions, the crew don’t actually seem to do very much*, but it’s also annotated so that each thing that they do do is explained clearly.
If you have some spare time (and who doesn’t in early January?), it’s worth a watch:

And then, should you so wish, there’s the landing to look at as well.
WARNING: You will end up in Johannesburg at the end of this particular video.

One thing I did notice in both videos is that there’s an awful lot of looking out of the windows, presumably for other planes. I’m not sure if I find this comforting or not. Sure, a final check left before heading onto the runway seems like a pretty good idea, but should it really be necessary? I suppose that it takes minimal effort and it could make a huge difference, but I do wonder if it ever has. A bit like me looking left when turning onto the dual carriageway this morning, so as not to hit the utter twat of a cyclist going the wrong way. (An incident that was apparently entirely my fault with only a few months until the Cycle Tour, obvs.)

Having flown on these beasts several (or more) times, albeit never on a BA one or into Joburg, it’s really interesting to see what happens up front when we’re sitting in the back having our headphones and blankets collected and trying to find where our shoes have disappeared to.

 

* almost certainly because they’ve done an awful lot of things previously to make sure that they actually don’t have to do very much during this ten minutes.