Back down to earth

Even as I begin this blog post, I have no idea what it will be about. How exciting is that?
“What a rebel! What a firebrand! How does he do it?” I hear the audience marvel.

I do know what it won’t be about though: flight. It suddenly struck me that my last three posts had all involved flight, and that I was inadvertently drifting higher and higher: 120m with my Mavic, 40,000ft on that Dreamliner and then about 408km for the International Space Station. This wasn’t at all intentional, it just happened that way.

Anyway, it could be that this post actually ends up being about not knowing what it is going to be about. I’ve been sidetracked so many times since I began writing it (picking fantasy football side, answering emails, doing lab work), that I’m now running out of time to complete it before I have other places to be.

Quota photo?

Quota photo.

How about another one of those Brittany lighthouses?

This one is La Vieille – the Old Lady – off the Pointe du Raz, and forms part of a chain of lighthouses guiding ships safely around the end of Brittany:

There you go. Not a wing, rocket or rotor blade in sight.

Kermorvan

A lighthouse in Brittany (and number four listed here): Kermorvan

Photo by Duarte Sol Photography.

Not my ideal style of lighthouse. I like the round tower – this is all a little too bulky and reminiscent of a castle keep.

But the photo – wow. The clarity and detail of the solid elements against that deliciously soft, cotton wool, long exposure sea.

Very nice.

Drone photography

I’ve done a bit of it over the last 6 months, since I got my Florence. And, in all honesty, I think some of it is actually quite good. But obviously I’m still learning. This guy has got it sorted though:

This is the Ludwigskirche in Munich, and it’s an amazing photo, but there’s something rather puzzling about this building: that unbelievably ornate roof – why?

No-one (save for drone pilots – and I’m sure that architect Friedrich von Gärtner who built it between 1829 and 1844 wasn’t really considering them) is ever going to see it.
And then I learned that although the mosaic roof had always been in the original plans for the building, it was only installed between 2007 and 2009. I’m yet to work out firstly why the original plans were never followed, and then secondly why they were finally sorted 165 years later.

Of course, should you lean that way, you’ll understand that there is one pair of eyes that will gaze down from above and enjoy the beauty of the roof:

Look what beauty they have created to please me. I am pleased.

…and will surely reward those responsible with a fat golden handshake, or at least everlasting life in heaven above (where they too can then see the roof in all its glory).

Thankfully, with the advent of drones, you don’t have to be really good for your entire life and then pop your clogs to be able to see this amazing mosaic.

Railz

A quota photo from Norway last year. This was taken lying between the rails of the Flåmsbana, just outside the village of Flåm.

The lengths I go to and the risks I take just to get interesting shots, ne? Not that I even needed to get interesting shots that day. The rest of the scenery was by far enough to ensure the day’s photographic mission was a complete success. Fjords are great in that way.

A year ago (or so)…

A year ago (or so), we were in Mauritius. And thus, when I was looking for a quota photo to put onto the site for what is promised to be a rather damp day in Agulhas, I thought I’d take a trip back there via Flickr.

This – the Mighty Servant 3 – was one of the large vessels sitting on the anchorage off Port Louis which we passed as we headed south to see and swim with the dolphins at the improbably named bay of Flic-en-Flac.

We’ve seen some Mighty Servant action off Agulhas as well (like this). But as you will see if you click through on that link, we were a bit closer on this occasion.