Weekend Listening: Everything Everything

The fourth album from this Manchester-based Indie-Synth outfit has been gracing my ears for several (or more) weeks now. It’s really, really good. Really good. The best good. Really good.
And with them releasing a third single from A Fever Dream, it’s high time that I shared something from it. Trouble is – which one?

Desire? A powerful monologue about needing to own and control everyone and everything, with a brightly colourful performance video.
Can’t Do? A desperate plea to escape a demanding and possibly doomed relationship, with a fitting video featuring emotional contemporary dancers.

Or this one: Night of the Long Knives with diving synth drops every few bars and a suitably busy, eclectic visual offering.

There’s lots more good stuff on this album though. Commercially good stuff, nogal. If you’re looking for something (mostly) energetic and just eminently listenable for the upcoming weekend (and beyond), may I humbly – and most highly – recommend this

Two Eighty

My favourite twitter post about twitter’s new 280 character limit was this one:

I know that it might not mean a lot to those readers who don’t use twitter, so belatedly, I’m dedicating this post to those readers who use twitter.

Sorry to the rest of you.

As for the 280 character limit, I’m slight on the I’d-rather-that-they’d-just-left-things-as-they-were side of ambivalent, but I won’t be demanding a refund (just yet).

David’s Water Crisis Facts

Mythbusting. It’s a thing. Two middle-aged gentlemen in San Francisco famously made a living out of it. So step forward then David W. Olivier, who – right from the get go – is anxious for us to know that he:

does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

That article being this one, in which he rejects our reality and substitutes his own:

David has gone out on a bit of a limb here by using facts and relevant information to make his case. An approach that the Facebook hordes are unlikely to recognise. And if you read it through rather cynical eyes, it does appear as a bit of a City of Cape Town puff piece, but then you realise that maybe, just maybe, they have also been using facts and relevant information when informing us about the water crisis.

Wow.

David hits us with truth bombs about the much alleged lack of preparedness:

Climate trends over the past 40 years gave no indication of the drought’s timing, intensity or duration. In fact, dams were overflowing in winter 2014. The weather forecasts gave no indication that the 2015 drought would continue over another year. A study by the University of Cape Town came out a few weeks ago, saying that the odds of the drought carrying over again into 2017 were less than one in one thousand.

He then goes in for a combination attack detailing the myths of lack of enforcement and water being lost to leaks, before a killer blow on the “why didn’t we build a big desalination plant?” debate:

A desalination plant large enough to accommodate Cape Town’s needs (450 megalitres per day) would cost 15 billion rand to build and then millions more to maintain.
There is a chance that by the time such a plant is built, the drought would be over. The city would be left with a very expensive white elephant.

And then, after a page or two of cold, hard realities, a single paragraph of reasoned opinion.

Blame shifting, fault finding and panic are usual reactions to water crises all over the world. Some anxiety is good, as it motivates water saving, but blame shifting actually pushes responsibility away, and causes water wastage. The best attitude Cape Town’s people can adopt is for every person to do their best, together. The world is watching, let’s set them an example to follow.

How dare you, David? How very dare you?

Of course, as a Cape Town resident, you might feel that sharing this sort of thing might move some of the responsibility away from the city and onto your shoulders. And, if I may be so bold, that’s probably one very good reason that these myths have conveniently gone unchallenged and been perpetuated on social media, around braais, and on social media around braais.

Why not lead the way by breaking the cycle and when one of these Seven Deadly Myths [Really? – Ed.] gets quoted in your presence, give them a friendly nudge or punch in the face and tell them the truth?

It’s ever so liberating.

Honourable mention

I, like you, was left reeling at the lack of any blog post on here yesterday. And while the so-called experts blamed football and beer, there was a whole lot of other stuff going on Chez 6000 over the weekend.

However, having said that, there was obviously some football involved, and it would be remiss of me not to mention Leon Clarke’s remarkable performance for United, as he beat Hull City 4-1.

There it is a red and white and I won’t mention the fact that the second mention of his name is ever so slightly misaligned with the others if you won’t.

I know. Once you see it… eish.

Anyway, everyone was very happy for Leon, including one Keith Edwards who was working for a local radio station at the match:

Keith was the last United player to score four goals in a game – against Gillingham in August 1983. But being a big United fan, I’m sure Keith was delighted to see his long-standing record repeated.

Of course, the last time that United scored 4 goals in a game was… er… this one. Leon got two that day as well.

Turgid Sausage

Careful now.

On the weekend, I bought some flat plastic tubing from local DIY Superstore Builders Whorehouse (Thanks, H). It cost at R18 a metre. That did seem a bit steep, but Builders isn’t exactly known for its great value.

I attached the flat plastic tubing to the bottom of various drainpipes around the house and positioned the other ends into the garden or the pool.

And, thanks to last night’s brief, thundery downpour, I was rewarded with several (or more) litres of fresh rainwater in a turgid sausage.

All of that (and the contents of the other sausages) would have been lost down the drain. But because of this somewhat serpentine intervention, we’ll now be able to use the pool for an extra 9 minutes this summer.

Awesome.