First French pics

Did a bit of work last night and I’ve now got some pics onto Flickr.

Here they are. Please do go and have a look.

This is just the first batch, documenting only the first few days of the holiday as well. I do seem to have taken a lot of photos.
Looking back through them now, I couldn’t even remember taking some of them.

The one above though: well, I decided that I couldn’t sleep, jumped off the boat (fortunately on the dry side) went wandering around a deserted village in my nightwear looking for shots.

There’s still another week of France to come before we head over to the UK and the Isle of Man.

And there are still all the images from my phone and my Mavic.

I’m still going to be busy for a while, then.

Soon

I’ve finally got started on editing some holiday photos.
Well, I say that. What I’ve actually done is to upload some of them (the first 8GB) to my laptop.

It’s something.

So I have randomly selected this one – taken in Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris – to illustrate the fact that I’m all over this photo stuff like a particularly aggressive moss.

Looking at the first lot of pictures, there are an awful lot of of images taken inside churches. But then, there were an awful lot of amazing churches. And you don’t have to be religious to appreciate the architecture and beauty of these places of worship.

Because of its location and size, Notre Dame is obviously well known and much visited, but we found equally breathtaking churches (if not quite to the same scale) in much smaller places like Auxerre, Clamecy and Châtel-Censoir. More of those later, but it’s worth noting that in many places, they would be huge tourist draws in their own right, yet they sit quietly and humbly with no signage, no pre-recorded audio guides, no nothing.

And I found that the experience of visiting them was better for that.

Last times…

Last time we were on the Isle of Man, it rained. It rained a lot.
It very rarely stopped raining. And then we went to Sheffield in it rained some more.

Now I know that the UK (of which the Isle of Man isn’t part), has a bit of a reputation for this kind of thing, but the summer of 2012 was unprecedented in its raininess. There were literally a couple of nice days during our entire three week stay. The Flickr collection I made is testament to this.

We deserve better this time.

Of course, I not forgetting that we did get better back in 2009. The holiday where I regularly ended up taking our toddler son out (not in an assassination kind of way) at 6am before he woke up the whole household because he’d forgotten how to sleep:

This one was taken at the Calf Sound, where there was only us, some rabbits, some seals and a small yacht.

He’s twelve now, and does sleep occasionally. I’m hoping that this holiday is one of those times.

London

Google Trips tells me that I am spending the day in London today.

Yes, the train from Paris arrived here yesterday evening, but then it was all about the dash to get down to our hosts’ place after a day of travel.

Today, we get to explore.

Last time we were in The Big Smoke was just 10 months ago on a day trip down from Sheffield. [pics]

The light was awful that day. But perfect if you wanted to get a menacing shot of a Tower of London raven.

It’s also Tynwald Day in the Isle of Man. According to Google Trips, we’ll be popping over there on Saturday morning.

Dun fishin’

The chances are that we will be doing some fishing when we get over to the Isle of Man. But although we are currently living and traveling on a canal/river (depending on how the journey North has been going) (pre-written post, see?), I’m not too keen to chuck a line over the side here.

Yeah. That talk of fishing was merely an excuse for an arty quota photo of a puffer fish which we found washed ashore on the beach at Suiderstrand. Its remarkable appearance, coupled with some early morning light and the addition of a subtle muted preset or two on Lightroom gave a striking, minimalist image.

Lots of dead stuff washes up on the beach in Agulhas. I don’t think that’s a bad thing, I think it’s just a natural thing. Nothing lasts forever, and when it doesn’t last forever somewhere out at sea, it’s likely that it’s going to end up washed up onto a beach somewhere. When it is washed up on a beach near us, we find it, because we’re observant like that.

Examples of this at Suiderstrand include birds, seals, puffer fish (see above) and – importantly, not seagulls or turtles.