The Architect

No. Not you. This:

Here at 6000 miles… HQ, our quest to bring you (good) quality music never ends. And, as has been recently proven, we’re pretty good at what we do.

Here’s something new for you then: Jane Weaver

Some phat Ultravoxy electronica and La Rouxy breathy vocals going on there. Wonderful.

You may remember Jane from such bands as Britpop group Kill Laura, or the folktronica project Misty Dixon, or like me, you may not. But either way, this is a great piece of work.

Says Jane:

Having spent a large portion of my childhood in the foreboding shadow of the 1965 Bernard Engle constructed concrete shopping center I developed a very visual love-hate relationship with the modernist architecture of my home town, but after travelling the world and appreciating both brutalist and modernist design from an exotic perspective I soon began to crave the incredible geometric design that de-saturated my 1980’s upbringing.

Yes. That’s pretty much how I feel about old buildings too. Sometimes.

Drought posters: too much?

Local authorities in Cape Town have come under fire this week for their latest attempts to convince tourists of the severity of the drought in the Mother City, with critics saying the posters “go too far”, and are “frankly rather scary” and “wholly distasteful”.

The summer tourist season is approaching, and many residents have expressed concern that transient visitors will either be unaware of our water crisis or simply won’t care, and would therefore waste our precious resources. Tourism is huge business in the Western Cape, with 1.5 million international visitors spending a massive R18 billion in the province in 2016. It’s clear that without that money, Cape Town would be in deep trouble, but running out of water completely would obviously be a disaster.

However, those same residents were stunned at the authorities response, with shocking posters which are set to be displayed prominently in the arrivals area in the airport and at popular tourist sites around the city.

Elsie Grootbek of Newlands was aghast:

Look, of course I know that the drought is a big issue, but South Africa does have a bit of a reputation and posters like this really don’t help with that. This is terrible. Which moron actually thought that this would be a good idea?

Reaction to other posters was equally incredulous. Fanie Praatbaie, a guest house owner in Melkbosstrand, couldn’t believe the posters and was concerned what effect they might have:

It’s bad taste and really off-putting. We’ll talk to our visitors, one to one, and explain the water crisis. We don’t need this sort of thing welcoming our tourists. It might even spark vigilante action if one of our guests takes a 4 minute shower or something. It’s hugely worrying.

However, government representatives were quick to point out that this ‘shocked’ reaction was exactly what they were after.

Spokesperson Willem van der Maydup told us:

It’s really not meant to be threatening. It’s just designed to make people think when they turn the taps on in their hotel rooms. Water is the lifeblood of any city, and we want visitors to value our water as if it were their own blood.
I showed one of the posters to my 6 year old son last week and it’s clearly had an effect: he hasn’t even gone into the bathroom since then. Or slept.

It’s unclear whether the backlash will force the authorities to change their mind on the controversial campaign, but with the local tourism season just around the corner, it may be too late to come up with an alternative means of getting their important message across.

Adulation continues…

I said it here.

And other people shared it here.

And now, just not quite a week later, it’s still happening. 😮

Look:

Isn’t he, though? Also:

And:

Ag, I don’t know about “melting the internet”. That sounds a bit like when the internet “destroyed Donald Trump” (Spoiler: it didn’t).

But it’s great that the band are getting some more airtime. And it’s nice that people are enjoying the stuff that I enjoy. Some sort of affirmation that I’m vaguely relevant, I guess.

Meh. I’ll take it.

Powder of Sympathy

I’m going to try some experimental stuff on the photography front this weekend – weather permitting. And that will result in experimental photographs. However, I obviously haven’t taken them just yet, so here’s a photograph of an experiment – or at least a photograph of a description of an hypothesis. Tenuous.

These days, one can simply glance at one’s smartphone to obtain an accurate reading of one’s latitude and longitude. And thanks to the position of the sun and the stars, sailors have long been able to gauge their latitude fairly accurately. Longitude was an entirely different kettle of fish though – the biggest limiting factor being that in order to calculate one’s longitude, one needs to know the time accurately. When a hefty prize was announced for anyone who could solve this problem, it attracted a lot of interest – not all of it entirely helpful. The Powder of Sympathy was one of the less successful ideas. I love the final sentence: as if we really needed telling.

Interesting fact about Cape Agulhas – it lies right on the 20° Meridian. And I mean pretty much exactly, right down to 6 decimal points. Given that we generally divide the world up into segments of 15°, this isn’t hugely important, but I have noted that if you poke the beagle at noon while standing on right on that imaginary line (I use my phone’s GPS to get it just right), it will let out a small bark, before glaring at you.

Now superseded by modern technology, back in the days of Diaz and van Riebeeck, every ship passing the Southern Tip would have had a beagle on board to poke as they rounded Cape Agulhas. This act wouldn’t tell them anything they didn’t already know, but it’s always good to poke a beagle whenever possible. Keeps them on their toes, see?

Physio visit

I’ve got an appointment with the physiotherapist this morning. Not having been to a physiotherapist before*, I thought I’d have a look online at what I should expect.

I can’t say that I’m really looking forward to it very much.

 

* This is clearly not true, but please just play along for the purposes of this blog post. Thanks.