World’s Worst Hide & Seeker

Actually, his seeking isn’t too bad, but we obviously do need to work on the hidage aspect of his game.

DSC00484a
I iz invizibul. U cannot see me behind my stick.

This was taken in February 2008 at Kirstenbosch Botanical Gardens and is a great example of what a quota photo looks like when one is trawling through one’s wife’s hard drive looking for quota photos because one’s hard drive is broken. Yes, despite several kicks to the side of the big boxy bit, I still have not had any joy in reinstating power to my machine. I’m not an expert, but even if I was, I really haven’t had time to sort anything out, as I have been rushing around today preparing for the imminent arrival of the 2009 Kids in Tow Tour and watching a brave and spirited Bafana Bafana performance during which not a single one of their players tried to gouge out the eyes of an opponent.
Although, with hindsight, it may have helped, because they lost.

This evening will be spent watching the Confederations Cup Final between Brazil and USA and singing a sickeningly annoying song from Balamory, which I heard several days ago and which refuses to leave the busy space between my ears. Still – I could be singing the theme from The Littlest Hobo, like you are now.

littleworld update

Incoming from Nicole – who commented on the original littleworld post:

I received a (short and sweet) reply from Anita Scott, Customer Service Head at Woolworths to the email I sent her about this issue.

“Dear Nicole
 Thank you for bringing this to our attention. I will respond to the customer.”

Her email was sent at 11:30am on Thursday 18th June. Please let me know if you actually do hear from her.

Keep up the good work!
Nicole.

Thanks, Nicole.

I can safely say, 25 hours on from her email to you, that no-one from Woolworths has got in touch with me.
I’ll keep you updated.

Stupid forms

Ah, the divine VAF1B.
I’ve spent my entire morning filling in three of them to apply for UK visas for my wife, my son and my daughter. Ten pages per application, with crippling repetition, bizarrely detailed requests for bizarre details and stupid questions galore.

For example:

In times of either peace or war have you ever been involved in, or suspected of involvement in, war crimes, crimes against humanity or genocide?

Seriously now, who – when applying for permission to enter the UK – is going to answer “Yes” to that one (and then provide full relevant detail in section 9)?
Certainly not my 10-month old daughter. And how can you commit war crimes in times of peace, anyway?

There was a worried look on the face of little Alex as I asked him question 6.14 though:

Have you engaged in any other activities that might indicate that you may not be considered a person of good character?

Especially after he had snatched the cuddly singing snake off his sister earlier in the day. I thought I’d better inform the UK Border Agency of that little incident, since they seem to want to know absolutely bloody everything:

When did you last visit the toilet and was it for number ones or number twos? (If number twos, please fully describe consistency of motion in section 9).

But despite even the most made-up of questions and the infinite detail to be provided, South Africa’s Department of Home Affairs still holds the record for the stupidest form ever. Their BI-24 allows you to register your child’s birth, but in the answer space for “Country of Birth”, fails to provide enough spaces for you to write “South Africa”.

I hope heads rolled. Seriously.

A couple of Micklethwaits

I was drawn to Brian Micklethwait’s blog archives in search of this staircase (don’t ask) and while there, started reading and stumbled upon these photographs taken in Bethnel Green last February.

  

As I have mentioned before, I enjoy Brian’s photography. It’s unpretentious, often imaginative, sometimes cheeky, occasionally rather clever. And then explained or narrated in much the same style.

Brian’s photographs are also mostly urban. And while many may appreciate beauty only in photographs of lakes and fields and mountains and trees, having lived in cities all my life, there’s something comforting for me about seeing wires, tower blocks, and cranes; industry and infrastructure, hustle and bustle.

In other news:
I recognise that the blog has been a little photo-heavy of late, but since the election, things have all gone a little quiet. Almost as if people are waiting for something to happen. It hasn’t. Yet.
There’s really only been the rather unexpected utterly bizarre behaviour of Helen Zille having a pop at JZ and the completely expected utterly bizarre behaviour of the ANC Youth League having a pop at Helen Zille, both of which have been done to death on the news sites and blogs over here.

So I didn’t bother.

I have always attempted to maintain a decent standard of writing on this blog and, if I’m completely honest, I notice that my standards drop when I’m writing about a subject that doesn’t interest my or that I don’t believe in. Thus, if I don’t find something worth writing about, I don’t write about it. All of which made sense when I started that sentence.

But, hey. Don’t worry. This is South Africa. Nothing ever stays normal for long.

Baby Admin post

Do these count?
Of course they do.

I have added the tweetmeme plugin to my vast range of WordPress plugins which make my life easier and make your reading enjoyment all the more… enjoyable.

If you’re active on twitter (and let’s face it, these days, who isn’t?) you can now retweet the content that you see here with just the click of a single button (that little green one under the post).
Share the wealth. You know it makes sense.
One great feature is that you still get to edit the content of your tweet before you tweet it. I suppose some people would call that a twedit.
Not me, though.

Go on – choose a post (hopefully more interesting than this one) and tell the world you were here!