Lots done

After a weekend which wasn’t even supposed to be spent at home in Cape Town, I find myself completely drained. I’ve done about a million jobs that I didn’t even know needed doing, but which – with hindsight – I’m actually glad I got out of the way.

There are a big couple of weeks ahead at work before our Europe trip, and I’ve been on the go all day, so I’m going to guide Panama a little closer to World Cup glory on the Playstation, rather than blogging this evening.

If that’s ok with you, that is?*

More – including news of Panama’s latest triumphs – tomorrow.

 

 

*  or even if it’s not, to be honest.

Late final

A late one this evening. An unexpected lie-in, a Year 4 Science project and a horrendous visit to the local shopping mall – which was somehow full beyond even pre-Christmas levels – almost did for me before we headed out to see friends in the Deep South.

I selflessly fell upon my sword regarding the shopping mall, saving others from a similar hellish experience via the power of social media.

At least three individuals got in touch to say thank you, and it’s that sort of gratitude that makes my sacrifice worth it.

Also, I got lots of new coffee pods at a hugely discounted rate, which was a bit of a bonus.

The Big News!

So, did yesterday’s post all about Svalbard achieve its aim of informing everyone about getting 6000 miles… a hit from Svalbard?

No. No, it didn’t.

It was a quiet day for the blog across the Northern hemisphere yesterday, and while USA, Canada, UK, Norway and Slovenia all checked in, Svalbard… didn’t.

[sad trombone]

Next week, look out for a fascinating insight into life in Turkmenistan.

Hello Svalbard

I recently watched a couple of videos from Svalbard. Things didn’t go according to plan for photographer Thomas Heaton because of the warmer than expected conditions there:

See?

It’s been documented by the Washington Post as well.

The international director of the Norwegian Polar Institute, Kim Holmen, who lives in Longyearbyen, says of climate change here, “This town is certainly the place where it’s happening first and fastest and even the most.”

Holmen notes that Svalbard used to be where students came to observe Arctic conditions. Now it is the place they come to study a climate in transition.

That’s it, Kim. Always look for the positives.

Of course, observing Arctic conditions studying a climate in transition isn’t the only thing to do in Svalbard, as I found out by googling Things to do in Svalbard.

Pyramiden looks like the place to be, not just offering mining and (possibly still?) glacier, but also polar bear and bear.

Ursines. One never can get enough.

And can we just take a moment to acknowledge the names of settlements in Svalbard? Svalbard is great.

The Longyear Town“, “Ice Fjord“, “The Pyramid” and er… “New Ålesund” (less impressive, let’s be fair) in that foursome above alone.

Many beagle-eyed readers will likely see this post as a thinly veiled attempt to get some readers in from the wonderful island of SVALBARD – one of the few places on earth from which 6000 miles… hasn’t been accessed. Maybe it is.

If you’re reading this, Kim Holmen, please give us a shout.

Cheers.

Delayed by coffee

Sorryforthelatepostingtoday.

IwentoutandboughtaNespressomachinethisafternoonandI’vebeendrinkingcoffeeeversince.

ThankfullyasidefrommynotbloggingearlierIdon’tthinkit’shadanyeffect.

Weeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!