Zebra & Giraffe – The Knife

I have been listening to a lot of Zebra & Giraffe recently, possibly due to their fantastic performance at CokeZeroFest.

This is a great example of their New Order meets The Cure at a local pub and a young Depeche Mode drop in and join them both for a swift Red Bull or two before heading off their separate ways vibe.

[youtube:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XqNy-RM1sWU]

It’s called The Knife. And it’s another surefire hit for Fleet of Worlds, whose musical tastes often seem dangerously close to mine.
He may want to see someone about that.

The Zebra & Giraffe album Collected Memories is available on iTunes and you can follow @Zebraandgiraffe on twitter. (Although it does seem to be mainly about stir-fries).

Quota Photo: Misty Cliffs

Featuring precisely no mist and no cliffs.

Although that is an incoming cold front. You can see it bigger here.

After all the fuss and palaver over the Stop Zuma campaign yesterday (and throughout today) I thought it was best to give myself and my readership a last minute break from all things election and remind you just how beautiful this country can be when it’s not getting all ugly over political issues.

Tomorrow, we’re back onto election stuff, because it’s election day.
But let’s try and keep things a little more lighthearted, shall we?

Happy voting!

Stop Zuma?

Impossible, my dear.

Yet that’s seemingly been the sole aim of Helen Zille and the Democratic Alliance over the past, final week of campaigning before the election. And it’s a tactic which has drawn criticism from many quarters for it’s negativity and single-minded determination to go after JZ, while there are plenty of other major issues and challenges which need addressing in this election.


Zille and her grand plan.

Sadly, it’s also a campaign which, as the international community sits up and takes notice in the run up to the election, has been reported around the world, with Zille’s scaremongering tactics dragging the country’s name further through the mud. See the New York Times’ report and the BBC’s South Africa ‘doomed under Zuma’. The latter is worth a look if only for the picture of Zille’s cabaret act – the article itself makes depressing reading.

This evening on the way home from a hard day’s science, I listened into John Maytham’s show on 567 Cape Talk. Maytham described himself as “revolted” by the Stop Zuma campaign and stated that he had been put off voting for the DA.
Then, in a shock move for me, I found myself agreeing with Maytham’s guest Jonathan Shapiro – the cartoonist otherwise known as Zapiro. But what surprised me more was that Shapiro, who was apparently previously an ANC voter but who will not be voting for them this time because of Zuma’s reputation, was also disgusted by the DA’s recent campaign, describing it as a “terrible mistake”. Strong words indeed from a man who has himself been accused of harbouring a vendetta against Msholozi. While he said he was still undecided about who he was going to vote for, the DA had joined the ANC on his list of ‘definitely nots’.

I don’t understand why the DA has suddenly taken this route. They are absolutely capable of winning the Western Cape in this next election, which was their stated aim. But whatever strategist persuaded them that moving away from campaigning on any other issue and concentrating on the futile task of “stopping” Jacob Zuma – whatever that means, anyway – has done them a great disservice. As far as I can see, having spoken to people, read newspapers and checked in on the local media, this negative campaigning has turned the voters away from the DA, Maytham and Shapiro being the latest examples of this phenomenon. If they had nothing to fight for, that wouldn’t be a big issue, but with the Western Cape as tight as it is, I can’t help but wonder – have Zille and the DA shot themselves in their collective feet by solely (no pun intended) going after Zuma?

List of charges against Jacob Zuma

In response to this search term from my wp-admin stuffs today:

search9
So good, they asked it twice.

Here you go:

 

 

 

 

Hope that helps.

Music in Politics

Those of you in South Africa will be well accustomed to the use of music in politics. So much of the African culture revolves around music and dance, that no decent South African political rally is complete without the obligatory traditional songs and dancing.
But music has also been used in politics in the UK too. Remember back in 1997, when Labour swept to power, D:Ream’s Things Can Only Get Better was their victory song. 12 years on, some might disagree with that sentiment.

The big difference of course, is that here, the politicians join in with the singing.
In fact, Jacob Zuma (our President-in-waiting) even has his own much-discussed theme song, Umshini wami. And he’s got quite a voice on him:

But things are changing. Perhaps having seen the success of JZ and eager to have about 30 million voters giving him their X, North Hertfordshire Council hopeful, the Liberal Democrats’ Allan Witherick has come up with his rap “Six to Fix”, malaigning the shortfalls of the current Conservative council.

I would ask you to compare the passion, the performance and the personalities of JZ and Allan. I would also ask you to ensure that you don’t have anything in your mouth as you click on the video below, as you may be in danger of
choking.

UPDATE: Allan has made his video private. If you’re watching it, you’re a friend of Allan. Just saying.
Fortunately, I’ve found a copy for you here.

Yes, “that, my friends is our six to fix in a funky mix with a little bit of flair”.

I’m glad he finished off by telling us that. I had completely missed the funk and the flair was sadly drowned out by he sound of my sides splitting.
Probably best we leave the music to JZ, hey?