World’s gone mad (Volume 4,386)

Chaos in UK over Brexit.
Have you done the #10yearchallenge yet? It’s (possibly) sinister (or not).
Scientists being forced to apologise for calling out acupuncture for being the shitty pseudoscience that it is.
A ridiculous amount of fuss from everyone – yes, everyone – over a shaving ad.
Zimbabwe in a mess. Again.
Terrorism in Kenya. Again.
USA in Government Shutdown paralysis. Again.
And the usual suspects on SA’s social media scene reminding us what we should think, type and how we must feel about all of these things.

If ever there was time for an asteroid intervention, this would surely be it.
But I’d actually like to see how the footy season ends first. Please.

So I’m a bit torn right now.

Thankfully, there’s always one voice of sanity in this mad, mad world. The steady, sensible voice of independent Primedia Broadcasting on the Medium Wave. The rock on which millions of several upper middle class South Africans can depend. I don’t listen myself, but if I was 70, I would, because they’ll tell you exactly what’s going on in a no nonsense fashion – just like in the 1950s. Not the 1950s here, obviously: there was plenty of nonsense happening then. No, the 1950s in good old Blighty where you knew where you stood and people were polite and frank and honest – and didn’t subscribe this this kind of BS:

Oh.

Woowoo peddling is obviously to be expected from some sources out there, but maybe you’d assumed you’d get better from Radio 702, because you thought that they were more highbrow, more discerning, more intelligent.

They’re not. They’re just as bad as all the others and if you choose to accept this from them, then what other compromises are you willing to make whiling away the daytime hours with their smooth-talking disc jockeys? And why?
Honestly, if this is an example of their political insight, surely just head to the Daily Sun for your election news? At least there you know what you’re getting and there’s no pretence about being all la-di-da and genuine.

World’s gone mad. Seriously. (I may have said this 4,385 times before .)

More drone photo disappointment

We’ve been here before (harvesting water lilies again, nogal), but…

Spoiler: they’re really not.

Now, I’m not saying that I could have necessarily produced anything better (although my waves breaking on rocks beats their waves breaking on rocks IMHO, so actually maybe I am).

but honestly, if these are the “50 best drone pictures of last year”, then… ugh.

The quality is disappointing, the variation in subject matter is really poor (any chance of another boat harvesting some plants or doing some fishing, please?) and the winner (reproduced here only so you don’t have to click through and be continually disappointed):

clearly breaks one of the many unwritten rules of flying a drone: don’t harass wildlife. Add to that several over roads and a few above crowds: it’s not exactly showcasing the best of drone etiquette.

Don’t get me wrong, there are some lovely photos in there, and I still firmly believe that taking photos from a drone opens up a whole new world of perception of common or everyday objects or scenes.

But “best 50 drone pictures of last year”? Sorry. No.
At least half of these are really rather ordinary.

Theresa May loses Brexit vote

And political cartoonist Matt hits the nail on the head once again:

This was an unsurprising result  and while there will be a No Confidence vote following later today, given that it is a straight choice between May and a scruffy communist, that result will also likely not be much of a shock either.

21 across tho

Was too knackered to upload this last night.
Bed by 9:30 – up and at them again early this morning.
Sorry for the wait.

It’s 2019, and the monthly mental test of the 6000 miles…  crosswords just keep on coming. And sWORDdevlin is especially proud of this one:

And yes, 21 across is very clever. See for yourself:

 

I found this one noticeably easier than previous episodes. I actually liked 7 across, but there’s Norway that you’ll get it.

10,000 steps folly

I have now knocked up 10,000 steps (or more – often more) each day for the last 45 days, according to my Garmin watch. Given that some days, I’ve done far more than 10,000 steps, I reckon I’ve managed somewhere around half a million steps in the last 6½ weeks. And that’s on top of gym visits and cycling and other things that don’t get recorded as steps.

And now it’s become a bit of a thing to keep it going, and that’s why (very occasionally) you’ll find me walking around the garden at 9pm just to knock off the last 500. Yes, I get health insurance points for it. No, they’re not really worth much. But yes, I do see it as something of a personal challenge and yes, I know that 10,000 steps (or so) is not going to be enough to keep this middle-age weight down.

That’s what (for me, at least) this guy fails to get. He doesn’t like the 10,000 step thing at all:

“There’s no scientific validation. It’s very hard to do it every day, and there’s no mention of intensity, or difficulty level, or heart rate, or breathing, or anything that determines whether exercise is valuable to you from a cardiovascular perspective.”

He quotes someone as saying.
Well, it’s not hard at all – as proven by my last 45 days.

If you are a top athlete (or even if you’re not), doing 10,000 steps (or anywhere thereabouts, because sure, this isn’t an exact science) is not going to make you into a world beater. That’s where the extras – the gym and the cycling – come in. You’ll need conditioning, coaching, a decent diet and perhaps even some mental training to achieve your lofty goals.

The thing is that it isn’t about that though. If you’re a top athlete but you need a watch to tell you that you haven’t done much exercise today, then actually, I’d wager that you’re not actually a top athlete at all.

But for the average Joe (or Joanne) on the street, a reasonably price watch which helpfully tells the time, and can give them some idea of how active they’ve been that day, is a godsend. Because then they can see that at 5pm they’ve been lounging around in front of a computer screen for too long that afternoon. And they can choose to do something about it.

Sure, Discovery (aforementioned medical insurance) uses 5,000 and 10,000 as their goto numbers, but then I can get as many points as I do for 10,000 steps each day simply by scanning my card at the gym. I don’t even have to look at a cardio machine, let alone do anything on one. They don’t value those 10,000 steps too highly.

It doesn’t even have to be 10,000 steps. Simply because “there’s no scientific validation”, that 10,000 really is completely arbitrary. Do what you want with the numbers: it’s there just as a guide, an aide-memoire.
But surely if it helps you to be more active than your mate who doesn’t subscribe to the 10,000 steps mantra, then it’s a good thing. It’s certainly not doing me any harm, anyway.

That said, blogging is a very sedentary endeavour, and thus I must get myself moving. These steps aren’t going to walk themselves, you know.